Planning Your Imaging Project

Imaging Project


 Planning Your Imaging Project

It seems that the developers of imaging facilities are trying to set up construction plans for imaging systems and budget pricing without understanding how the project can be best organized.


Although many want to avoid the obvious you really can not plan anything without first determining how much will be available to spend? Most project managers understand the overall cost of different diagnostic imaging systems and are already considering the costs of available facilities. What other costs need to be considered?


You do not want to plan to change a facility without having an architect/engineer of an experienced medical facility. You need to interview local professionals with strong references and get quotes for their services. 


These people are extremely important to the project because they will provide the specification that the contractors will use to offer the restoration.


Next, you need to get prices for the systems you intend to purchase for the facility. Although prices will change over time, recovery specifications must include features required to adapt to the systems to be purchased. 


Therefore, contracting the purchase of these systems early will ensure that the facility specifications accurately represent the requirements of the systems. Whether the cost of the project is increasing from the expected alternative systems can be considered. 


Although many want to delay the purchase of systems, the smart move is to lock in specific design requirements by purchasing the system before construction so that no construction changes are required after restoration begins or ends - these late changes can be costly.


Once the architect understands the layout of the building and the requirements of the system he can develop building renovation specifications for contractor proposals.


 Two to three experienced medical facility contractors should be interviewed and invited to bid on the project. Local contractors are preferred but when this is not possible the location of the contractors should be considered.


 The contractor should be responsible for obtaining the appropriate building permits. Negotiate with the contractor on cumulative payments and be based on meeting the schedules for completing various parts of the project.


Once the restoration proposals are completed they can be assessed along with a construction schedule. Although pricing is critical, sometimes the timing of the project can be just as critical.



 For example, if contractor "A" is 8% lower than contractor "B" but the renovation time is longer for contractor "A" the cost of the business lost for 40 days should be considered.


The construction contract must be given a schedule and the system suppliers must be determined regarding the planned delivery dates. 


Although few projects stay on schedule after being properly planned ensures cost and schedules will not become an issue or get out of hand.


Finally, if you decide that you do not have the time or experience or desire to plan and manage a project, you can hire organizations like ours to plan and implement the project from start to finish for a fee that usually ranges from 3% - 5% of the project cost.


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